Recipe du Jour

Sweet Rhubarb and Watermelon Pickles

pickled

Just in time to enjoy the summer’s bounty, I bring you a great pickling recipe from my new book, Salt: The Essential Guide to Cooking with the Most Important Ingredient in Your Kitchen, which hits the shelves on Sept 6. I love these sweet fruity pickles as a balancing accompaniment to salty charcuterie dishes, or as a tart, balancing feature to super-sweet desserts. Also, I like them right out of the jar, as I stand in front of the fridge.   You can make the two separately, but I like the essence of summer they evoke together. The charred spices add a layer of sophistication that powdered dry spices simply can’t.

Ingredients

4 cups rhubarb, cleaned and cut into 2-inch lengths

4 cups of the white meat of the watermelon rind (Use a potato peeler to remove the tough green skin)

1 cup water

1 cup cider vinegar

1 cup sugar

1 tablespoon unrefined sea salt—try Sal de Mara, Murray River, Panngasinan, or Japanese Shio

1 soft Mexican cinnamon stick

3-4 star anise

Method

  1. Combine rhubarb and watermelon rind in decorative jars, or plastic containers with fitted lids.
  1. In a small saucepan, combine water, vinegar, sugar and salt. Bring it to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer until the sugar and salt are dissolved.
  1. Using tongs, hold the cinnamon sticks and star anise over an open flame, until they ignite. Allow to burn for a few seconds, until charred, then drop them into the pickling liquid. Pour the liquid—spices and all—over the rhubarb and watermelon. Let cool at room temperature, then refrigerate for at least 1 day. The texture stays crisp for about a week. After a while, when you find they are too soft, add them into your favorite relish, chow chow, or chutney recipe.

Variations

Fennel – Sliced raw fennel bulb makes an equally enticing pickle using this recipe. I add the chopped fennel fronds to the mix as well.

Carrot – Try this same recipe with slices, or long julienne shreds of carrot. Add some ginger into the brine for fun. And why not try it with rainbow carrots. Yellow and orange together make a bold statement. Purple carrots bleed their color onto the others during curing, so soak them in a separate container.

Radish – Standard radishes, with red skin and white meat, turn a lovely shade of pink in this brine.

Print this recipe

FEATURED BOOKS:

Salt: The Essential Guide to Cooking with the Most Important Ingredient in Your Kitchen

Salt: The Essential Guide to Cooking with the Most Important Ingredient in Your Kitchen

More than 100 mouthwatering recipes―plus nearly 50 varieties of infused salts―with beautiful, full-color photography will help you transform this classic, humble ingredient into a star seasoning.

Mug Meals: More Than 100 No-Fuss Ways to Make a Delicious Microwave Meal in Minutes

Mug Meals: More Than 100 No-Fuss Ways to Make a Delicious Microwave Meal in Minutes

Dinner on the go, cooking for one, or just want to mix up a quick snack? Mug Meals will show you how!

No-Churn Ice Cream: Over 100 Simply Delicious No-Machine Frozen Treats

No-Churn Ice Cream: Over 100 Simply Delicious No-Machine Frozen Treats

Discover how to make homemade ice cream and other desserts!

The Spiralized Kitchen: Transform Your Vegetables into Fresh and Surprising Meals

The Spiralized Kitchen: Transform Your Vegetables into Fresh and Surprising Meals

Get the most out of your spiralizer with these delicious and inspiring low-carb recipes!

Techniques

Ground Spices and Spice Blends

whole spices
The best spice are always ground at home. Spices will keep for years if left whole. But the minute they are ground, they start deteriorating. That means the spice blends in your market are far less flavorful than they once were.

The process isn’t hard, but it does take a little time.

For many spices, the first step is toasting. (This is important for anise, caraway, cumin, coriander, fennel, and similar seed-type spices.) Heat releases the spice oils, which changes their flavor, usually for the better. Use a dry pan, preferably made of cast iron, which conducts heat evenly. Add the spices to the pan and keep them moving by shaking the pan or stirring. This constant movement ensures the spices will toast evenly. As soon as they become fragrant, the toasting is done. Be careful, as these tiny seeds and berries can burn very quickly. Remove them from the heat and the pan. Remember, the pan is still hot and it will keep cooking the spices until you remove them.

Next comes the grinding. Cool the spices before you grind them. They are easier to handle, and they emit fewer fumes.

I prefer to use a coffee grinder for this job. It is small, which forces the spices through the blade more often than a larger food processor or blender does, producing a finer, more even grind. I recommend you get a separate grinder just for spices. I have had some mighty weird coffee after a particularly spicy kitchen escapade.

When I am feeling historic, I enjoy grinding in a mortar. The result is rougher, but more spiritually satisfying. (Culinary geeks, unite!) There is also a method the French call mignonette, in which whole spices are crushed by the flat bottom of a frying pan. This works well for peppercorns. Don’t whack the pan onto the spices like a fly swatter, but rather, use the pan to knead or rub the spices into submission. This is typically done with pepper, but it works for everything in a pinch. I like to do this when I am trying to impress people. It’s fancy!

Some recipes call for spices to be toasted in oil. The oil changes the flavor of the spice, and it takes on the flavors, carrying them throughout a dish.

Sometimes the toasting of spice blends is done in stages, giving each ingredient the perfect cooking time to release its maximum flavor. But when we’re talking about blends of 10-20 spices and herbs, I just don’t have that kind of time. Just keep in mind that small particles of spice cook faster than large ones. If your mixture includes tiny seeds, add them to the pan last, or watch super carefully while it cooks and use it as an indication of doneness for the rest of the mix.

Many spice blends include important ingredients that shouldn’t be toasted, because they will burn. Dried herbs like thyme or oregano, powdered ginger, or granulated garlic are some examples. Use a little common sense here, and try not to smoke out your room mate.

The holiday basics, cinnamon, nutmeg, and clove don’t need toasting, but do benefit from a fresh grind. I put them all into the coffee grinder by crunching up the whole sticks, bashing the whole nutmeg nut into smaller bits with my meat mallet. Add a copule cloves, and any additional ingredients. (Hint: I like to add a star of anise, and a handful of cardamon seeds.) Then I whiz it all into submission and proceed with m holiday baking.

Print this technique

Follow on Tumblr

Follow on Pinterest

Top